Islands

Ag_socstudies_island

Develop a 3D scene that depicts an Island environment
K-6

Islands frequently evoke visions of sun, surf, and pleasurable experiences.  Not all islands resemble that mental vision.  Islands are generally accepted as bodies of land, smaller than continents, surrounded by water.  Some islands are singular, while others have many in a grouping (archipelagos).  Islands are formed by several different mechanisms such as volcanic action, evaporation of water, growth of coral, and dynamics of the earth pushing land masses.  Some islands are barren, cold, and uninhabitable, while others are virtual paradises for people, plant life, and animals.  Islands may be named based on who discovered them, where they are, or historical events that occurred on them.

Preparation
Review activity discussion with children.  Have pictures of some famous islands available (National Geographic or travel magazines have materials).  Islands are frequently written about in the Travel section of newspapers.  Children can be assigned a project to collect pictures before starting the activity.

Procedure
A discussion on islands is a good starter for this activity.  Students who have travelled to an island can report to the class briefly on their experience.

Students are assigned (or choose) an island environment to construct (volcano, rock, atoll). Alternately, students can be assigned specific islands to draw (e.g. Cook, Adak, Greenland, Oahu).

A scene of an island's environment is constructed and printed out.

On the printout, students write a sentence(s) or a structured paragraph about the island scene.

Evaluation
Assessments can be based on a journal entry, oral report of the scene, or observation of activity.

The teacher should ask students to explain why they picked objects, people, or other characteristics as a reasoning exercise.

Extensions
Have students make a picture of the Earth as an island in the sky.

Discuss the different meanings of the word *island* such as when it is used to refer to kitchen furniture, a parking lot cement device, or part of an aircraft carrier.  Discuss how island is used in names (Rhode Island).

Develop a fantasy Island environment.

Have class discussions on why different plants and animals can live on islands.  Homework projects can be assigned to research particular islands or island features.  Reports are shared with class.

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